Choosing The Correct Type Of Cinnamon For Best Health Benefits

Cinnamon is a favorite spice for many! The smell and taste can't be beat! But, did you know cinnamon can benefit your health, too? Tap her to learn all about it, what to look for to ensure you are using the right one in your kitchen, and a tasty snack recipe that features it,

It is a favorite spice and smell for many -- cinnamon!  That distinctive floral flavor with a bit of heat can't be beat.  But, did you know cinnamon can benefit your health, too? Scan on down to learn all about it, what to look for to ensure you are using the right one in your kitchen, and a tasty snack recipe that features it, too!



HEALTH BENEFITS OF CINNAMON


Besides the great taste and amazing smell, check out this list of health benefits . . . if you choose the right one:

  • Reduces your blood sugar
  • Calms your stomach
  • Stosp that resistant yeast infection
  • Keeps any leukemia and lymphoma cells from proliferating* 
  • Reduces your arthritis pain 
  • Acts as a natural food preservative by inhibiting bacterial growth
  • Increases your manganese, iron and calcium levels
  • Lowers your LDL cholesterol levels




CINNAMON LABELING AND ITS DECEPTION


Who knew such a darling of our spice cabinet held such power.  But wait a moment and look a little further as there is an important caveat regarding the label.  Most cinnamon labeled as such at most grocery stores is really not the cinnamon that carries the same level of health benefits listed above.

It may look and smell and even taste like cinnamon, but it may be actually cassia, not the true cinnamon, Ceylon Cinnamon.  Ceylon Cinnamon also has a more subtle flavor with a little less bite and a more floral note with health benefits the impostors do not share.


Cinnamon is a favorite spice for many! The smell and taste can't be beat! But, did you know cinnamon can benefit your health, too? Tap her to learn all about it, what to look for to ensure you are using the right one in your kitchen, and a tasty snack recipe that features it, too!

CASSIA AND WHY TO AVOID IT


So why all the fuss?  Here is the distinction:  Cassia contains coumarin, a naturally occurring toxin which has the potential to damage the liver in high doses. Cassia contains high levels of this, whereas Ceylon contains only traces. Those high levels of coumarin in the cassia is what brings on the undesirable side effects listed in the section below.

Always check your source and read labels to ensure you are purchasing the true one - Ceylon.  Also note that Cassia is also referred to as Vietnamese, Chinese, Saigon, Java or Padang Cinnamon. Check your labels for those, too.  Or, if nothing is listed on the label, before you toss anything out of your spice drawer, call the manufacturer to identify their cinnamon source.




SIDE EFFECTS OF TOO MUCH CINNAMON


Go ahead and sprinkle, but keep in mind, like most foods, too much of a good thing is . . . well, . . . not a good thing.  More than half a teaspoon at once can do this:
  • Irritate your stomach
  • Increases your heart rate – not always desirable.
  • Act as a blood thinner so not good before surgery or if you are taking prescription blood thinners.
  • React as a rather powerful antibiotic so if you are on a prescription for one, it could interact with your other drugs.
  • Strain your kidney and liver

Try this easy, healthy and yummy snack recipe full of protein and antioxidants that you can make ahead and it keeps for weeks! It features lots of crunch with a bit of sweet and a kick from the healthy type of cinnamon that you can learn all about here.



RECIPE: ALMOND CINNAMON CRUNCH


Here is a recipe that uses Ceylon Cinnamon that I enjoy as a treat or little gift:  It contains a bit of sugar, though.


Gather
  • 2 cups whole raw almonds
  • 3 tablespoons raw honey
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons almond oil or coconut oil
  • 1/8 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon ground Ceylon Cinnamon
parchment paper


Now do this

  • Roast almonds in single layer in a 350 degree oven on a tray lined with parchment paper for about 15 minutes or until deeper in color.
  • While almonds are roasting, combine honey, water, oil and vanilla in medium sized pan and let it come to a boil.  Keep warm.
  • Combine sugar, salt and cinnamon in small bowl. Set aside.
  • Add almonds to the honey mixture and stir until well coated and until almonds have soaked up the mixture, about 5 minutes.
  • Transfer the nuts back to the parchment paper in a single layer and sprinkle with cinnamon mixture.
  • Allow to cool.
  • Store in sealed container.
recipe adapted from cooks.com
*U.S. Department of Agriculture

2 comments:

  1. This is such a helpful and vital distinction. My Dad was complaining about the stomach discomfort he experienced after eating food containing powdered cinnamon. It was possibly the Cassia which your mentioned in your post. He has arthritis so it would be helpful to try using Ceylon Cinnamon to help ease his pain. My husband has high cholesterol so I would like to use a good cinnamon to help his efforts to lower cholesterol naturally. Thanks for sharing this valuable post at the Healthy Happy Green Natural Party! I'm Pinning and sharing this!

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    1. I am so happy to hear you learned something here, Deborah, and I really hope it helps your family out by finding the right cinnamon and the correct or tolerated amount for them. Thanks for adding in here!

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